Things To Take Off Your Resume

“This is the best resume I have ever seen” – says one post in a Creatives Group. Looking at the six-page photo group, it definitely is not. 

There are different types of resumes with some managers preferring one over another. However, there are certain things you need to steer clear off regardless of the format you choose. 

Unless completely important or an asset, perhaps it’s best to leave the home address out. Hiring managers factor in loads of facts and possible situations in assessing candidates. One of which could be the travel from your house to the office which could affect your time and performance. Your city is enough to narrow down your location at this stage of the process. 

Hiring managers don’t need to know unnecessary information about you. They don’t need to read “responsible for client communication” over and over, one job after another. Organize your career experience by specifying achievements per project or company you’ve been in. And if it’s not related in any way to the job you’re applying for, you don’t really have to put in singing as your hobby. 

No, they don’t need to know your objectives or statement of purpose. Don’t you think this is a little too outdated? Try sparing a space for a brief career history instead. It’s the perfect way to introduce where you come from, where you are, and where you want to go. Keep it short and simple. You’re already applying for the job, they know you need it. Prepare for the interviews so they know you want it. 

Those scales have got to go. Your 80% graphic bar on your Spanish Language skills is only going to confuse hiring managers where the 20% went. It doesn’t make sense. A full pie graph of an abstract concept like “creativity” is a poor example of irony. I mean if you’re going to make things up along the way, don’t be too obvious at the least.

And finally, don’t put obvious givens in your resume! It’s kind of expected that you’re honest, punctual and hardworking, so unless you know of a job or industry where its common to be dishonest, late or lazy, don’t write these attributes on your resume!

Your resume is the foot you need to get in the door. There might not be a room for mistakes, but there certainly isn’t room for a six-page tome featuring photos, hobbies and bar graphs. 

To prepare for interviews, you might want to check this other article out.

About the Author
Simon Lader

Simon Lader

I am an almost twenty year veteran of the IT industry. I started recruiting for IT sales and presales people in 1997 and I’ve been doing it ever since. Originally living in Manchester, UK, I now live in Las Vegas and specialize in helping startup and high-growth software vendors find the best sales and presales people in North America, Asia Pacific and EMEA. My three kids and long suffering wife keep me sane (or as close to it as possible) - which, as a Manchester United supporter, isn’t always easy! I probably watch too much Netflix and drink too much Single Malt Whisky, but what’s life without a little misbehavior now and then. Click here to schedule a free 15 minute consultation phone call with me; or click here to send me a message.

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